Skip to content

Queen Ifrica

Reggae singer from Montego Bay, Jamaica

Armando Bellmas
Armando Bellmas
Queen Ifrica

Today on Ecléctico you're listening to Queen Ifrica, a singer from Montego Bay. She uses her music and status to defend women and children against all forms of violence and abuse in Jamaica and beyond. She is Rasta by faith and the daughter of ska music legend Derrick Morgan.

You'll go deeper with an excerpt from and a link to an interview between Queen Ifrica and Angus Taylor on United Reggae.


"Grabba" by Queen Ifrica
2017 | Reggae singer from Montego Bay, Jamaica


Go deeper.
Queen Ifrica [praises] the culture of loud reasonings in her Rasta community – where everyone can put aside their differences and eat and smoke together at the end of the day. Foreigners sometimes mistake this forcefulness of discussion for anger. “The culture of Jamaica is so fascinating. It is unique in itself, the way people communicate with each other. You could walk outside and hear this loud commotion and it is just people having a good chat! They don't need drinks, they don't need anything, they just have that off the top of their heads.” She laughs. “I am one of those loud conversationalists. But I can also be calm if I want to - especially if I burn some herb. Our energy is at the top at all times and it comes across strong, sometimes to our benefit sometimes not.”

The reasons why Jamaican character is so overproof, she says, stretch back into the island’s brutal colonial history. “I think it's this urge of wanting to show your strength so much. Always being suppressed for whatever reason. The history is so strong in terms of pain and emotions that have never been healed fixed or even been given a rub on the shoulder to say "I know what you went through". So people had to find ways to generate that passion, to make fun of it. If you go into the inner city communities you see people just find stuff in the middle of the mess to make fun of, to feel a part of. It was aimed at easing the pain and then it became something so beautiful that it is used worldwide - in terms of the dance, in terms of the fashion, in time in terms of the style of lyrics, in terms of the style of projection on stage. All of that comes out in just wanting to express that urge of belonging.”

Jamaica

Explore more music

Members Public

Marcia Griffiths

Jamaican reggae singer

Marcia Griffiths
Members Public

Simplicity People

1970s studio house band from Kingston, Jamaica

Simplicity People